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Keynote Lectures

Design by Units - A Novel Approach for Building Elastic Systems
Schahram Dustdar, Vienna University of Technology, Austria

Hybrid Modeling
Dimitris Karagiannis, University of Vienna, Austria

Managing Online Business Communities
Steffen Staab, University of Koblenz-Landau, Germany

Requirements Engineering: Panacea or Predicament?
Pericles Loucopoulos, Manchester University, United Kingdom

Trends in Blog Preservation
Yannis Manolopoulos, Aristotle University, Greece

 

Design by Units - A Novel Approach for Building Elastic Systems

Schahram Dustdar
Vienna University of Technology
Austria
 

Brief Bio

Schahram Dustdar is Full Professor of Computer Science and head of the Distributed Systems Group at the TU Vienna. From 2004-2010 he was Honorary Professor of Information Systems at the Department of Computing Science at the University of Groningen (RuG), The Netherlands. He is an Associate Editor of IEEE Transactions on Services Computing, ACM Transactions on the Web, and ACM Transactions on Internet Technology and on the editorial board of IEEE Internet Computing and IEEE Computer. He is the Editor-in-Chief of Computing (Springer). Dustdar is recipient of the ACM Distinguished Scientist award (2009), the IBM Faculty Award (2012), a member of the Academia Europaea: The Academy of Europe, and an IEEE Fellow (2016).


Abstract
Systems are built by utilizing resources. Resources can include infrastructure such as compute power, storage space, and bandwidth, but also nontechnical resources such as the financial budget available or the human (expert) manpower needed to skillfully operate the system, make decisions, or perform human-based computing tasks. The elasticity of a system through virtualized resources is thus a fundamental requirement of Web-scale systems; in system design, those resources must receive careful consideration. In this talk I will discuss the main principles of elasticity and present a fresh look at this problem, and examine how to integrate people in the form of human-based computing and software services into one composite system, which can be modeled, programmed, and instantiated on a large scale in an elastic way.



 

 

Hybrid Modeling

Dimitris Karagiannis
University of Vienna
Austria
 

Brief Bio
Dimitris Karagiannis is head of the research group knowledge engineering at the University of Vienna. His main research interests include knowledge management, modelling methods and meta-modelling. Besides his engagement in national and EU-funded research projects Dimitris Karagiannis is the author of research papers and books on Knowledge Databases, Business Process Management, Workflow-Systems and Knowledge Management. He serves as expert in various international conferences and is presently on the editorial board of Business & Information Systems Engineering (BISE), Enterprise Modelling and Information Systems Architectures and the Journal of Systems Integration. He is member of IEEE and ACM and is on the executive board of GI as well as on the steering committee of the Austrian Computer Society and its Special Interest Group on IT Governance. Recently he started the Open Model Initiative (www.openmodels.at) in Austria. In 1995 he established the Business Process Management Systems Approach (BPMS), which has been successfully implemented in several industrial and service companies, and is the founder of the European software- and consulting company BOC (http://www.boc-group.com), which implements software tools based on the meta-modelling approach.


Abstract
In the fast paced and complex world of new business models, powerful techniques for supporting business operations and next generation enterprise systems are widely sought-after. For this purpose, modeling methods have not only been discussed and elaborated from an academic perspective but have also been successfully deployed on an industrial scale. For taking into account the distinct requirements of individual users and organizations, the creation of new and the adaptation of existing modeling methods are today common requirements. This process, denoted as “hybrid modeling”, will be presented in this talk, based on the foundations and current challenges for the conceptualization of modeling methods, their implementation and deployment. The approach will be illustrated by reverting to a number of recent examples from the Open Models Initiative that provides an open community platform for the exchange of know-how on modeling methods, models and tools. Thereby we will revert to a meta modeling framework that has been developed at the University of Vienna. Furthermore, results of successful applications based on the ADOxx® platform in research and industrial projects will be shown.



 

 

Managing Online Business Communities

Steffen Staab
University of Koblenz-Landau
Germany
 

Brief Bio
Steffen Staab is professor for databases and information systems at the University of Koblenz-Landau. He is director of the institute for Web Science and Technologies (West; http://west.uni-koblenz.de). He is programme chair of WWW 2012 and editor-in-chief of Elsevier's Journal of Web Semantics. His interests are related to many aspects of Web Science, such as Semantic Web, Web Retrieval, Social Web, Multimedia Web, Software Web and Interactive Web. Steffen is project coordinator for the EU Integrated Project "Robust - Risk and Opportunities Management of Huge-Scale Business Community Cooperation". Previously, Steffen held positions as researcher, project leader and lecturer at the University of Freiburg, the University of Stuttgart/Fraunhofer Institute IAO, and the University of Karlsruhe and he is a co-founder of Ontoprise GmbH.


Abstract
Online Business Communities constitute an asset to companies for various purposes such as open innovation, customer self-help or knowledge management. In this talk we will present challenges and opportunities that arise from actively monitoring and managing business communities.



 

 

Requirements Engineering: Panacea or Predicament?

Pericles Loucopoulos
Manchester University
United Kingdom
 

Brief Bio
Pericles Loucopoulos is Professor of Information Systems in the Business School, Loughborough University, UK. He began his career in the City of London where he was responsible for delivering systems for financial applications. He moved to Manchester in 1984 to take up an academic appointment at the University of Manchester Institute of Science & Technology (UMIST) where in 1990 he was elected to the post of Professor in Information Systems Engineering in the Department of Computation. He has taught at Université de Paris I – Sorbonne, the University of the Aegean, the Delhi Institute of Technology and the Athens University of Economics and Business and has acted as scientific expert for U.K., Greek, Italian, Austrian, and Swiss Governmental institutions. His research work focuses on supporting the transformation of large, complex and dynamic enterprise systems through the provision of information systems. Theoretical results derived from his research have been applied on industrial scale problems in a variety of domains, such as banking, utilities, large-scale sports events etc. For his work he has received the 2005 OR Society’s President Medal and the Inform Society’s Edelman Laureate Medal. He is the co-editor-in-chief of the Journal of Requirements Engineering, associate editor of Information Systems and of the Journal of Database Management and serves on the Editorial Board of 10 other journals.


Abstract
The genesis of Requirements Engineering (RE) research around the mid 1970’s was motivated by practitioners, who noticed the urgent need for disciplined RE in software projects that had grown large and unmanageable. Much of RE research since then has focused on artifacts that maintain the intellectual discipline by helping capture, share, represent, analyze, negotiate, and prioritize requirements as a basis for design decisions and interventions. The field of RE is arguably one of the most sensitive areas in the development of not only software but more importantly in the development of systems and organisational structures and processes supported by such systems. The scope of this keynote talk is to examine the contextual and methodological factors underpinning much of the practice of RE, to critically examine the utility of current thinking, to identify a set of challenges that are likely to shape the filed of RE in the years to come and to map a set of research directions that are likely to play a significant role in addressing these challenges.



 

 

Trends in Blog Preservation

Yannis Manolopoulos
Aristotle University
Greece
 

Brief Bio
Yannis Manolopoulos is Professor and Head with the Department of Informatics of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. In the past, he has been with the University of Toronto, the University of Maryland at College Park and the University of Cyprus. He has also served as Rector of the University of Western Macedonia in Greece and Vice-president of the Greek Computer Society. He has co-authored 4 monographs published by Kluwer and Springer, as well as 280 journal and conference papers related to Data Management. He received over 3500 citations from 700 distinct academic institutions and 2 best paper awards from ACM SIGMOD and ECML/PKDD conferences. He has supervised 19 PhD graduates. He has also served as main co-organizer of several major fora, such as ADBIS’2002, SSTD’2003, SSDBM’2004, ICEIS’2006, ADBIS’2006, EANN’2007, ICANN’2010, AIAI’2012 conferences. He has acted as evaluator for funding agencies in Austria, Canada, Czech Republic, Cyprus, Estonia, EU, Hong-Kong, Georgia, Greece, Israel and Russia. Currently, he serves in the Editorial Board of The VLDB Journal, The Computer Journal, the International Journal of Data Warehousing and Mining and the International Journal of Knowledge-Based Organizations. More info on his homepage: http://delab.csd.auth.gr/~manolopo/yannis.html


Abstract
Blogging is yet another popular and prominent application in the era of Web 2.0. According to recent measurements, as of now worldwide there are more than 150 million blogs with content spanning over every aspect of life and science, necessitating long term blog preservation and knowledge management. In this talk, we will present a range of issues that arise when facing the task of blog preservation. We argue that current web archiving solutions are not able to capture the dynamic and continuously evolving nature of blogs, their network and social structure as well as the exchange of concepts and ideas that they foster. Furthermore, we provide directions and objectives that could be reached in order to realize robust digital preservation, management and dissemination facilities for blogs. Finally, we will introduce the BlogForever EC funded project, its main motivation and findings towards widening the scope of blog preservation.



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