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Keynote Lectures

Security Applications of GPUs
Sotiris Ioannidis, Foundation for Research and Technology - Hellas, Greece

Taming Complexity with Self-managed Systems
Danny Menasce, George Mason University, United States

How Digital Twins Enable Model Driven Manufacturing
Mike Papazoglou, Tilburg University, Netherlands

 

Security Applications of GPUs

Sotiris Ioannidis
Foundation for Research and Technology - Hellas
Greece
 

Brief Bio
Modern graphics processors have been traditionally used for gaming, but in the last few years they have been used more and more in the area of high performance computing. In this talk we will explore alternate uses of graphics processors, in the area of security. We will discuss how a defender can use graphics hardware to bolster system defenses, and how miscreants can exploit them to build better and stealthier malware.


Abstract
Dr Sotiris Ioannidis (male; project coordinator) received a BSc degree in Mathematics and an MSc degree in Computer Science from the University of Crete in 1994 and 1996 respectively. In 1998 he received an MSc degree in Computer Science from the University of Rochester and in 2005 he received his PhD from the University of Pennsylvania. Dr Ioannidis held a Research Scholar position at the Stevens Institute of Technology until 2007 and since then he is a Principal Researcher at the Institute of Computer Science of the Foundation for Research and Technology - Hellas. His research interests are in the area of systems and network security, security policy, privacy and high-speed networks. Dr Ioannidis has authored more than 100 publications in international conferences and journals, as well as book chapters, and has both chaired and served in numerous program committees in prestigious conferences, such as ACM CCS, IEEE S&P, etc. Dr Ioannidis is a Marie-Curie Fellow and has participated in numerous international and European projects. He has coordinated several European and National projects (e.g. PASS, EU-INCOOP, GANDALF, etc.), and is currently the coordinator of several H2020 European projects, including I-BiDaaS, C4IIoT and THREAT-ARREST.



 

 

Taming Complexity with Self-managed Systems

Danny Menasce
George Mason University
United States
 

Brief Bio
Daniel Menasce is a University Professor of Computer Science at George Mason University, VA, USA, where he was Senior Associate Dean of its Volgenau School of Engineering for seven years. He received a PhD in Computer Science in 1978 from the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA). Menasce is a Fellow of the IEEE and of the ACM, a recipient of the 2017 Outstanding Faculty Award from the Commonwealth of Virginia, the recipient of the 2001 lifetime A.A. Michelson Award from the Computer Measurement Group, as well as the recipient of several outstanding research and outstanding teaching awards. Menasce authored over 270 papers and five books published by Prentice Hall. His research interests include self-managed systems, analytic performance modeling of computer systems, security performance tradeoffs, and software performance engineering.


Abstract
Modern computer information systems are highly complex, networked, have numerous configuration knobs, and operate in environments that are highly dynamic and evolving. Therefore, one cannot expect that configurations established at design-time will meet QoS and other non-functional goals at run-time. For that reason, the design of complex systems needs to incorporate controllers for adapting the system at run time. In this talk I will describe the four properties of self-managed systems: self-configuring, self-optimizing, self-healing, and self-protecting. I will also describe how these properties are enforced by controllers I designed for a variety of domains including cloud computing, fog/cloud computing, internet datacenters, distributed software systems, and database systems.



 

 

How Digital Twins Enable Model Driven Manufacturing

Mike Papazoglou
Tilburg University
Netherlands
 

Brief Bio
Michael P. Papazoglou is a highly acclaimed academic with noteworthy experience in areas of education, research and leadership pertaining to computer science, information systems, industrial engineering and digital manufacturing. He is the executive director of European Research Institute in Service Science and holds the Chair of Computer science at Tilburg University, the Netherlands. He is noted as one of the original promulgators of ‘Service-Oriented Computing’ and was the scientific director of the acclaimed European Network of Excellence in Software Systems and Services (S-CUBE). He is renowned for establishing local ‘pockets of research excellence’ in service science and engineering in several European countries, China, Australia and the UAE. Papazoglou is an author of the most highly cited papers in the area of service engineering and Web services worldwide with a record of publishing 32 (authored and edited) books, and over 200 prestigious peer-refereed papers along with approx. 18,000 citations (H-index factor 53). He holds distinguished/honorary professorships at 11 universities around the globe. He has delivered over 45 keynote addresses since 2000 and chaired 12 prestigious international peer refereed conferences. Papazoglou is the founder and editor-in-charge of the MIT Press book series on Information Systems as well as the founder and editor-in-charge of the new Springer-Verlag book series on Service Science.


Abstract
Industry 4.0 is blurring the lines between the physical, and digital spheres of global production systems. Industry 4.0 sets the foundations for a completely connected factories that are characterized by the digitization and interconnection of supply chains, production equipment and production lines, and the application of the latest advanced digital information technologies to manufacturing activities. The manufacturing paradigm championed by the Industry 4.0 brings together processes, software services and systems, machines, devices, IoT, sensors, valves, actuators, manufacturing systems, and connected digital factories. All these systems have both a digital component and a physical interaction with the real world. The result is a “digital-twin” model of the connected ‘smart’ factory of the future where computer-driven systems create a virtual copy of the physical world and help make decentralized decisions with much higher degree of accuracy.
This talk has dual purpose. It first describes how the concept of digital twins enable a model-based engineering approach that enables a concurrent, collaborative design process where users examine and define requirements, propose solution architectures, demonstrate and exchange ideas with stakeholders, and consider product feature tradeoffs. Subsequently, it proposes a novel programming paradigm and a flexible environment that helps product engineers to develop design-to-production industrial automation solutions by employing structured higher-level modular software techniques.



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